How To Pass On An Employee For Promotion?

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How To Pass On An Employee For Promotion

Promotions are often hard-won. Many workers believe they deserve to advance their careers and will contend fiercely for that chance.

However, the unfortunate truth is that there isn’t room for everybody at the top of a firm’s command chain. Some employees will undoubtedly perform better than others, and it’s your duty as a manager or business owner to decide who is most capable of taking on more responsibilities. Those who display leadership skills should be keenly considered, too.

That said, one must navigate these decisions with care. Your employee relationships can break down if rejections and commiserations aren’t handled tactfully, so it’s worth strategising your approach here. Workers often receive a lot of advice on what to do when passed over for promotion, but bosses and managers aren’t always prepared for these situations, either.

So, how should you pass on an employee for promotion? The suggestions below should help.

How To Pass On An Employee For Promotion?

Refer to Expert Consensus

You’ll know why your employee hasn’t been promoted. They may even know it themselves, deep down, too.

However, it would help if you didn’t leave them with your justifications alone. Many experts can reasonably theorise why workers don’t advance, and it’s worth referring to that consensus. That way, you can explain there is a precedent behind your decision-making. The approach may also ensure that the employee won’t suspect you have some vendetta against them. If your rationale aligns with an expert’s, few can justifiably argue with your verdict.

Refer to Expert Consensus

The employee may also feel like they’ve been more objectively passed over for promotion, thus more inclined to take concrete steps toward their development. It’s not bad luck that has led to the rejection, but something actionable that can be altered. Ultimately, referring to an expert-driven consensus can build a stronger foundation for these discussions.

Encourage the Use of an LMS

If a worker has been passed on for promotion, they still need to believe that their career isn’t dead in the water. There needs to be further room for enrichment and reward.

A learning management system (LMS) can achieve that. It is one of the company’s most responsible investments. Employers develop their teams through these programs, encouraging independent learning and giving workers all the resources they need to develop their careers. Employees can access training wherever they are, and any type of learning can be assigned and tracked; in-person, online, video, social, in-person, or a mix of all of them.

Encourage the Use of an LMS

Of course, your business may prefer one e-learning platform over another. Working with Kallidus, you can explore a demo of LMS learning opportunities to see if the service is suitable for your company. Know that many reputable organisations trust the platform, from Aston Martin to the NHS. It’s also user-friendly, so you won’t need to train your workers to get familiar with the systems. It can provide instant satisfaction for your workers.

Employees need to know that there are facilities to allow them to bounce back from rejection quickly. The right LMS platform can ensure that happens, restoring a worker’s confidence and refocusing them quickly. Remind them of those opportunities, and give the employee a say in these strategies too. That way, they’re still moving forward in a promising fashion. Positive and proactive attitudes are required here.

Be Empathetic

The workplace used to be a cold and calculating place. These attitudes are unacceptable by today’s standards.

You must be sympathetic to an employee who didn’t get the promotion. While that doesn’t mean you need to make grovelling apologies, you should thank the employee for their interest in the position and let them know their contributions are valued regardless of their position. Express these sentiments in person to appear more genuine and heartfelt.

Be Empathetic

Think about setting an example too. The behaviour of senior staff members can influence others in your business, so being mindful and kind in your interaction is key. Otherwise, an employee may assume that a detached personality is the best way to go about being regarded well, which will create other problems in the business. Build up their self-esteem.

Try to show restraint here, as well. After all, it can be possible to oversteer in your empathy and to potentially make promises you cannot keep. Be direct and to the point; your employee will understand their position and hopefully even value it.

Follow Up Regularly

The discussion around promotions is constant. As your firm grows, so will the number of positions for leadership.

Try not to treat the first conversation as a closed matter. If your employees use an LMS, you have great reason to check in on their development.

Follow Up Regularly

While you shouldn’t promise a promotion in the future, you can at least acknowledge that the worker has aspirations they are working hard to achieve. Recognise their efforts, even if they don’t earn them a promotion.

Following up on these conversations lets staff know there’s more to the workplace than ascending a career ladder. The work they do has inherent value on its own, and there are other ways to develop as a person and a professional. Continued conversations get that message across.